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Ancient Greek, Verb, pronounced Ekh-o. The Transliterated word is Echo. New Testament Greek Lexicon

 

“[To] have (hold) in the hand, in the sense of wearing, to have (hold) possession of the mind (refers to alarm, agitating emotions, etc.), to hold fast keep, to have or comprise or involve, to regard or consider or hold as.”

 

Source: http://www.crosswalk.com

 

Text Menu for Blind Readers: Home, Publications: -Philosophy, -Experiences, -Psychology, -Arts education, -History, sociology and culture Who’s who: -Philosophy, -Experiences, -Psychology, -Arts education, -History, sociology and culture, Institution guide, Gallery, Calendar, Editor, Archive

 

 

Who’s Who: Personal Experience

Unfortunately, too little attention is given to the personal experience of blindness. Many researchers prefer instead to rely on their own observations during experiments rather than trust first hand experience. However, many intellectual insights are given by authors introspecting on their own notions of aesthetics or institutionalisation, or from comparative reviews of these books and essays.

 Johan Kleinhans

Information on Kleinhans

According to Revesz, the Austrian Kleinhans was the first recorded congenitally/early blind artist. He was also renown for being the first blind person to be taught art, in the early 19th century. Kleinhans, a devote catholic - in the mould of his teacher, Klein—specialised in carving crucifixes, and reportedly several of his pieces still exist in churches in the Tyrol.

Helen Keller

Information on Keller

Although not the first recorded deaf blind person to be educated—this title went to Laura Bridgeman—Keller certainly became the most famous as her writings were renown throughout the western world. Although she received no art education, per se, she often wrote about her appreciation of the beauty of nature through her remaining senses.

John M Hull

Information on Hull

Currently working at the Queen’s Foundation in Birmingham, whilst retaining his emeritus chair at Birmingham University, the Anglo-Australian theologian Hull is perhaps the best known 20th century author on the experience of blindness. Coming to prominence for Touching the Rock, he has helped raise awareness of the arts, disability and blindness.

Helen Keller

Information on Keller

Although not the first recorded deaf blind person to be educated—this title went to Laura Bridgeman—Keller certainly became the most famous as her writings were renown throughout the western world. Although she received no art education, per se, she often wrote about her appreciation of the beauty of nature through her remaining senses.

Esref armagan

Information on Armagan

The early blind Turkish painter Armagan has been described by Kennedy as one of the most important artists in the history of western thought. Although not receiving a formal arts training Armagan has developed a surreal style of figurative painting involving elements of perspective and colour, through verbal feedback from those who observed him work.

Gary sergeant

Information on Sergeant

The British painter Sergeant is perhaps the most commercially successful artist who is registered blind. Working out of his home county of Yorkshire, Sergeant, who was once a designer in independent television, paints vivid, strongly coloured pieces based on local scenery. His work has been exhibited in the British and European parliaments.

 

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